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Some of my Favorite Things

BY Lisa Lindblad

March 3, 2012

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Toto for sure… Who doesn’t love a friendly loo that promises a warm bum. And the scale of furnishings, so low to the ground, suits me down to the ground ( no pun intended). But the Shinkenzan is a thing of beauty, and the ladies in pink, who rush in to the arriving sleek monster to change doilies and spray the air made me gape.
The discipline. The restraint. The perfection of it all. It is remarkable to see the care given to all aspects of life be it cleanliness, aesthetics, packaging ( everything is wrapped and boxed) or food display. Yet I believe – and this is another story – that there is a trade off for such perfection.

 

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Bountiful, Beautiful Bamboo